Marvel Musings: The Best Action Scenes of Phase 1

Yeah, I decided to go for action first. I guess I should start with a small disclaimer: I am not the type of person who is satisfied with a lot of destruction and cool special effects. In fact, there is nothing worse for me than a movie which offers nothing but that. Nothing more boring than an action scene which goes on for too long – though too long is relative. Sometimes five minutes can be too long, sometimes I can still be entertained after half an hour if an action scene is well-made. So, don’t be too surprised if I don’t necessarily go for the big action scenes:

5. Hulk vs Abomination

The Incredible Hulk is not a movie which will ever get a lot of love from me. There are a number of issues I have with it, but not necessarily more I have with some of the other early Marvel offerings. But it is a monster movie. I think that monster movies are boring. Jurassic Park might be the one exception, and even that is not a movie I would be keen to watch again and again (yeah, I know, I am not a proper nerd). Thus said though, the final battle scene is pretty cool. I certainly take it over most of Iron Man flying around (with some exceptions, but that is a topic for phase 2).

4. Thor vs. SHIELD

I guess everyone else would pick one of the more big scale action scenes on Thor. But to me, this is the one I got the most invested in, simply because of narrative behind it. Sometimes a smaller scale delivers a better pay-off, and in this case the pay off is Thor trying to lift his hammer, while Clint Barton is ready to shoot him the moment Coulson gives an order. I guess I experienced the scene differently than die hard comic book fans. I didn’t realize what the cameo meant back then, I just thought that the remarks he made were funny. The whole set-up lamp-shaded something which has always bothered me in a lot of action movies. If there is a guy fighting through a bunch of goons in a more or less open room, why don’t you simply shoot him from afar? So they already won me over there. But when Thor finally reaches his hammer that was easily the first time I actually felt for him in this movie. (What? He was an annoying brat beforehand and strangely unbothered by being cast out).

3. Black Widow vs. goons

In a way, this is the opposite for Thor scene, because this is hand-to-hand combat in a location, in which a shot from afar isn’t that easy to take. And seeing Black Widow move smoothly through a bunch of goons, not pulling her punches in the slightest, is a welcome change from the usual Iron Man action, which is usually very low on direct confrontations. As much as everyone is harping about the inclusion of Black Widow into Iron Man, this was the scene which made it worth it. At least for me. (Could have done without the “sexy crouching pose” though)

2. Cap jumps over the explosion

The First Avenger is barely mentioned when it comes to action. I guess because most of the action scenes are either pretty simple  in the sense of them being more about Steve running through the streets, or they are part of the montage. The movie also rarely lingers on an action packed moment, unless it is for a money shot. But then, for someone like me, this is perfect. There is certainly no danger of an action scene in The First Avenger overstaying its welcome.But the moment which gets my attention every single time is Bucky and Steve trying to escape the burning facility. The fight shortly beforehand, when Cap confronts the Red Scull the first time is kind of pathetic. But the scene after? When Bucky first has to walk over the small make-shift bridge and then encourages Steve to jump? It’s very old school adventure movie suspense, but it works on me every single time.

1. Battle of New York

What else? This deserves the credit for the fact alone that it is a half an hour long action scene (at least) and yet, I was never bored by it. I think what I like the most about it is how it showcases the different abilities of the Avengers. After that scene nobody will ask why exactly Cap is the leader, he obviously has a tactical mind. Between Hulk taking out the giant alien ship, the group shot and “puny god” this action sequence is full of memorable moments. But what I like the most is that this battle is as much about protecting the people on the ground and limiting the damage on a very specific section of the city as it is about taking out the enemy. The camera often takes the perspective of the people on the ground, instead of taking in explosions from afar, like a lot of action movies do.

All in all, Marvel started pretty well, action-wise. In a way, each movie got a little bit better in this regard. Especially The Avengers. If there is one aspect in which the movie shines, it is the action. Especially in the way how every action-scene is about more than just action. Each of them also tells the audience something about the characters in question. I think you could watch just the action scenes of the movie, and you would nevertheless have a pretty good idea of the characters involved. That is the kind of writing which makes action work even for someone like me, who needs more than explosions to be satisfied.


Marvel Musings: The Most Defining Scenes of Phase 2

I have thought a long time where I should make the cut between Phase 2 and 3. It is easy with the movies, Phase 3 starts with Civil War. But the TV shows? Does the third season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. belong to Phase 2 or 3? I finally decided that everything which aired before 2016 is Phase 2 and everything after it Phase 3.  So, Phase 2 includes in my eyes Iron Man 3, Thor: The Dark World, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Guardians of the Galaxy, Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, the first seasons of Agent Carter, Daredevil and Jessica Jones as well as Season 1, 2 and the first half of Season 3 of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. But before I list the most defining scenes of this phase, I have a dishonourable mention:

Iron Man 3 : Tony throwing away his arc reactor

I already mentioned in my last article good and bad consequences. Tony being forced to live with the arc reactor in his chest was one a great consequence, a constant reminder of what his weapons can do. And Iron Man 3 just took it away! Forget the Mandarin, this is the true crime of this movie. Because if a consequence like this can just be reversed in a fast narration, what is the point of anything? Imho, this is the single worst decision which was ever made within the MCU.

But enough ranting, let’s talk about the good stuff. Here are the ten most defining moments of Phase 2 (be warned, there will be spoilers):

10. Ant-Man: Thomas the Tank Engine

The MCU spend Phase 2 with final fights which just got bigger. Iron Man suddenly had an army of robots as back-up, Thor was jumping through the convergence, Age of Ultron lifted a whole city into the air – it seemed like the only direction for the MCU was up. And then Ant-man came around and went small (pun intended). Pulling back from the big battles to more personal stakes gave the MCU the breathing room it needed. And nothing stands more for this approach than having a fight in the bedroom of a little girl, with Thomas the Tank Engine as special guest.

9. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Season 3: Coulson “kills” Ward

Biggest mistake ever! Coulson had the change to destroy Hive once and for all. The only thing he had to do was to forget his revenge and haul Ward back through the portal, bringing him to justice instead. Now he has unleashed a monster on the world. The only thing this event isn’t higher on the list is because it will most likely not impact anything else but the show.

8. Agent Carter: Peggy walking down the street

Welcome in the past, with an image, which summoned up the theme of the first season perfectly. Peggy walking in the opposite direction of a crowd dressed in in a costume which instantly became eponymous  for her with its blue, white and red colour palette symbolically summons up the struggles of her life. Always on her own path, stepping to her own tune, paving the way for S.H.I.E.L.D. – and for the Avengers. After all, it was Nick Fury who brought them together.

7. Guardians of the Galaxy: Star-Lords Dance

Guardians of the Galaxy was not only the surprise hit of Phase 2, it was also the first step into the space-verse of the MCU. And nothing defines the movie and this corner of the universe as well as Peter Quill dancing his way to a hidden treasure, using alien vermin as microphone.

6: Daredevil: Matt takes out people smuggler

The Netflix shows opened up yet another corner of the MCU, one for the gritty street-level heroes. And the first scene set the tone for it. Bloody, brutal and a hero which walked away with a number of bruises, there was no doubt that this would be different from everything which came beforehand after this scene. The show gets bonus points for showing how the Battle of New York impacted the community.

5. Age of Ultron: The Battle of Sokovia

Maybe it should be higher, but I guess there will be more than one element which causes the Civil War. But at this point the battle already was referenced in Ant-man and impacted Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. with the now more negative view on heroes and gifted.

4. Thor, The Dark World: Loki replacing Odin

With any other villain, this would only be half as interesting. But Loki is one of the most unpredictable characters in the MCU. What is his plan? What happened to Odin? And why did he send Sif to Earth twice since he has taken the throne? All questions which will be hopefully answered in the next Thor-Movie.

3. Captain America, The Winter Soldier: Bucky is alive

Not exactly a big surprise for avid Comic book readers, but let me tell you, for the general audience this came pretty much out of the left field. “Who the hell is Bucky?” is one of the most memorable lines in the MCU. And it practically rewrote history. Did Bucky kill Kennedy? Howard Stark? What exactly did he do while he was under Hydra’s control? And what will happen now that he has broken through the conditioning? Not to mention that he will apparently cause the rift between Steve and Tony.  

2. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Season 1 : The Fall of S.H.I.E.L.D. / Ward is Hydra

Okay, it might be slightly cheating to give the show credit for something which happened in the movie (thus allowing me to put the other important twist in The Winter Soldier on the list), but those two events are too closely connected to each other to not consider them one. Plus, it is one thing to intellectually know that S.H.I.E.L.D. will never the same again, and another thing to see everything falling apart up close. When Ward turned out to be a traitor, nobody saw it coming, even though it made sense. And having Hydra back in the picture provided a string of compelling villains.

1. Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Season 2: The Terrigen is released into the Ocean

It is kind of odd that THE big event in the MCU happened in the TV-show and not in the movies, but here we are. Even though the movies will most likely never officially acknowledge it, here is one of the main reasons why there is a sudden influx on super-powered people in the MCU. Supposedly Doctor Strange will be the last origin story, but we won’t need them anymore either way. There is no longer the need to make up strange accidents or experiments (though no doubt those will still happen), fishoil pills are now the to-go reason for Superpowers. Kind of goofy, but also very fitting. And a good preparation for the Inhumans movie, even though that one will most likely stand-alone, too.

Well, this was a little bit more difficult than the first list, mostly because some of the impact was difficult to gauge just yet. Next list will be easier. I will either go for best action or most emotional moment – feel free to tell me what you want to see first.


Marvel Musings: The Most Defining Scenes of Phase 1

I is always difficult to do Top Ten lists of an ongoing series, because as long as new content is added, it will always be subject to change. Thankfully the MCU has this handy little Phases. So I start with Phase 1. And I’ll use a handy tool to do so: Top Five lists. Yes, Top Five, not Top Ten. I’ll do Top Tens once I reach Phase 2, but since Phase 1 consists of exactly six movies (Iron Man 1 and 2, The Incredible Hulk, Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger and The Avengers), I think Top Five lists will provide exactly the right groundwork, especially since every movie is allowed to provide exactly one moment. And I am starting with the five most defining scenes of phase.

To clarify, with “most defining” I mean those scenes which define the movie in question, preferable scenes are both memorable, as well as having a big impact in the universe. And you might have guessed it: The incredible Hulk didn’t make the list. Of all the MCU movies, it is the one which can be skipped most easily. If not for General Ross turning up again in Civil War, I would claim that nothing in it carried actually over to later movies. But let’s see what the other movies have to offer.

The Five Most Defining Scenes of Phase 1:

5. Iron Man 2 / Tony watches the old recordings of his father

Now, the picture I connect the most with this movie is Tony sitting in the donut (yeah, that says more or less all about it). But the moment I think resonates the most within the universe is this one. Tony’s complicated relationship with his father was already hinted to in the first movie, but here the MCU opens a whole can of worms. But even more, it opens a door to the past. The MCU would feel way smaller if not for the sense that behind everything we see on screen, there is a rich history behind it. And Howard Stark is the first link to this history, being one of the founders of S.H.I.E.L.D. I don’t think that they will address it in Civil War, but he is also one of the elements which split Steve and Tony apart. For Steve, Howard Stark is a friend, someone who fought by his side. For Tony, Howard Stark is the guy who always ignored him, and who gave him a legacy of death. In a way, he is the embodiment of the fact that every story has more than one angle.

4. Thor / Loki lets go

I could also simply say “Loki” because to this day, he is the biggest unsolved mystery in the MCU, and it all started with this moment. Sure, he spends the whole movie pulling off a convoluted plan in a desperate attempt to get attention from his (adoptive) father.

3. Captain America: The First Avenger / Steve wakes up in the future

Currently there is (again) this discussion going on which Avenger should die in the upcoming movie. I think that death is the most boring of all consequences. After all, if a character is death, his story is over, right? But what happens to Steve is one of the most compelling of all consequences. The world he knew has vanished and he has now to deal with a century with an entirely different outlook on war and heroics. And on him. But the MCU goes for extra-points by now only exploring what his sacrifice meant for him, it also examined what it meant for those who left behind. Especially Peggy and Howard.

2. The Avengers / The Group Shot

There is a reason why this group shot of the Avengers is constantly used by “Honest Trailers”. This was it, the moment all the work Marvel put in Phase 1 culminated into one memorable money shot – quite literally. Before the Avengers became the highest grossing Superhero ever, the very notion of a shared universe was considered to difficult to pull off. Now every studio is trying to built one of their own, with so far questionable success. We will see if any of the attempts pan out, but even if they do, The Avengers will always be the first, the trailblazer for the current age of Comic book movies.

1. Iron Man / “I am Iron-man”

It is hard to believe that there actually is something even more important than the Avengers changing movie making forever, but at least as far as the MCU is concerned, this is the moment which threw down the gauntlet. It says “no, we won’t do the whole secrecy thing”. It says “we’ll write our own rules”. It says “we love comic books, but we know that there are some clichés which have to die”. This scene set the tune for the MCU which is, despite all its craziness, still firmly connected to reality, in a sense that it asks the question: “If there really were superheroes pop up in our reality, how would we react?” And really, why should someone like Tony Stark hide his true identity? Being a rich genius, he is a walking target anyway. So why not be a flying one?


Marvel Musings: Let’s get excited

I have decided to add a new topic to speak about to this blog. Don’t worry, I am still working on my article about the Soundtrack of Beauty and the Beast. But I admit, I am currently neck-deep in the MCU. I just love this franchise, which is kind of a surprise for myself, because I am neither a comic book fan, nor did I ever had a particular interest in Superhero movies. But here I am, all enthralled in this universe which spans movies, shorts, network TV and Netflix-shows. And like every fan out there, I love to talk about my obsession. Plus, I actually don’t think that it is too much of a stretch to add Marvel movies to this blog, considering that it already does cover the work of all the other Disney subsidiaries which make movies.

Currently I am weeping every time I see the ratings of Agent Carter. I just don’t get it. Of all the Superhero shows on Network TV, it is by far the one which offers the most quality. A cast full of movie-level actors, clever writing, not to mention all the effort which goes into the costumes and setting, this show deserves way more love. It will be a crime should it go off the air due to low ratings.

I am also excited about the upcoming second half of Agents of SHIELD. Talk about a show which has steadily improved since it started. I can’t wait to see the secret warriors in action. And they have just announced that a particular character I enjoyed very much last season will turn up again.

I am a little bit more weary about the new season of Daredevil. I am excited about the Punisher as antagonist, but I have the feeling that they go for a Matt/Electra/Karen love triangle which would be just…urgh!!! Please, spare me! Also, it doesn’t look like Marcy Stahl will be in the upcoming season, which would be a shame, I really liked her character.

And then there is Civil War. Moderating my expectations for it is difficult. I think this will be the first time that I will watch the movie on its release date, even if it means that I’ll have to go alone (normally I first have to coordinate a date with my friends, but this time I won’t wait until our work schedules match). I have the feeling that this movie will not only be a game changer, it will also be the first Marvel movie which will end on an unhappy not (with a glimmer of hope thrown into it, to make it not too much of a downer ending). Unlike others I still think that this movie won’t cover the whole Civil War, but only the start of it, causing Avengers to be broken apart until Infinity War I. After all, the tagline of the movie is “divided we fall” – so I want to see a fall, even though it will hurt. A lot.

Well, until Civil War, I intend to cover some ground concerning the MCU. I already shared some of my thoughts when I discussed the female movie characters in it in my other blog, but there is way more to say about it. So I guess I’ll start with a number of top-something lists.

 

 


The Swanpride Award: And the Winner is….

The Top Three:

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

I think you could give each of those movies the award without any argument. But I do have to pick one, and this time, I’ll go mostly for personal taste in my decision. At this point the movies in questions are too close together quality-wise and too different in structure to do otherwise.

My least favourite of those three is easily Princess Mononoke. It is a movie I appreciate, but I don’t really connect to it on an emotional level. I also have some trouble with the way gore is portrayed in the movie. This might sound strange, but it is a little bit too artsy. How can you really get the point across if the violence shown looks that, well, good? It kind of undermines how dire those situations are.

Now, neither Beauty and the Beast nor Fantasia are perfect. I already mentioned the high number of animation snafus in Beauty and the Beast, but I didn’t mention the fluid timeline. The movie always leaves the impression that Belle and the Beast spend a lot of time with each other, a notion which is underlined by the fact that the movie goes from green pastures to winter in just a few frames. But the whole movie actually happens within a couple of days, maybe four or five tops. In a way, though, it is an impressive trick which makes the relationship between Belle and the Beast more believable. Even though they barely spend time with each other it feels as if they know each other for ages.

The big downside of Fantasia is the pacing. This sounds like a strange complain concerning a movie which consists of a number of segments which could be exchanged at will, but, well as much as I like Fantasia, I always had trouble to sit through the Rite of Spring segment, which is considerably longer than the others. And while I think that Fantasia is wonderful love letter to animation, it sometimes doesn’t go far enough for my taste. I once ranked all the Fantasia segments which Disney ever made and only one of the top three were from the original Fantasia. Even though the movie also provided half of the top ten segments, I can’t help but thinking that Fantasia while good could have been even better. Still, it is one of those “one of a kind movie” (despite its sequel) which will always stand out.

In the end, there is only one decision I can make. The winner of the Swanpride Award for the best movie of the 20th century is:

Swanpride-Award-Winner.jpg

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST!!!

 

Yes, I go with the obvious choice, the movie which was also picked by my readers. In multiple rounds of voting, Beauty and the Beast was the one movie which never got a single vote against it. And it is to this day the only traditional animated movie which ever got an academy award nomination for best picture and it will always the only animated movie which was honoured this way before the academy expanded the list from five to ten.

There were a lot of movies on my way to this final choice, which were endorsed more by me than anyone else. Sometimes because the movie in question wasn’t that well-known (honestly, how many people can claim that they actually saw “The Adventures of Prince Achmed” the way it should be seen, in an old-style movie theatre with a live-orchestra?), sometimes because I ignored the more popular movie in favour for a more challenging one. But Beauty and the Beast is one of the few movies which has everything. It is a movie which pleases the audience while still having a meaningful story to tell. It is a technical achievement which is not all about the new gimmick. It is the kind of movie which will withstand the test of time, because it will always be as meaningful as it was the day it was created.

And I guess it is time to explain why the movie works as well as it does – at least regarding the soundtrack. I am not sure how long I’ll need to finish writing it, but expect one long article about why Beauty and the Beast has maybe the best soundtrack of all musical-style animated movies, soon.


The Swanpride Award: The Forgotten Movie

I know I promised to decide on a winner for Christmas, but before I do this, I do have to give a movie its due which I somehow managed to overlook. I am actually not sure how this happened. Between all the nomination lists I (or one of my readers) should have noticed its absence sooner, but I guess even though this movie was a huge success when it hit the theatres, it doesn’t really play in the big league after all. The movie in question is….

 

A Land Before Time, 1988, Don Bluth, Traditional

 

Now, I don’t think that it would have made it in the final selection, because it was released in a very strong year for Japanese Animation. And honestly, the very fact that I forgot about this movie despite it being one of my childhood memories shows that it is lacking something. Even though you can’t do an animated movies with dinosaurs without someone saying “this is a little bit like A Land Before Time”. Even though (or perhaps because) it had a number of direct-to-video sequels. And a terrible animated series.

Let’s do this a little bit different this time around. Here is what I don’t like about the movie:

The plot is very simply and the protagonists are mostly defined over one character trait. I also think that the religious undertones are a little bit odd. Not bad, just odd. And then there is the T-Rex, who is oddly interested in what it is barely a mouthful. Wouldn’t it make more sense to follow the bigger group of dinosaurs?

And here is what I like:

While the plot is simple and the characters could use some additional layers,  both work really well as a backdrop to address the themes like faith and the value of diversity. Unlike other Don Bluth movies, which are full of random characters, this one focusses on the main group. The animation is gorgeous and the T-Rex is as a result properly terrifying. And then there is the soundtrack. The score is very atmospheric (hard to go wrong with James Horner) and “If We Hold on Together” is one of those songs which are not exactly unforgettable, but which pop immediately back into your mind once you hear the tune.

All in all this is certainly a movie which is worth the watch.

 

Now, even though I didn’t narrow it down further this time around, you can. Pick three, leave the one you think should win.


The Swanpride Award: Top Three

Here is the Top 5:

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

The Secret of Nimh (1982), Don Bluth, Traditional

The Little Mermaid (1989), Disney, Tradtional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

This really isn’t getting any easier, especially since those are very different movies…with the exception of The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, which are kind of similar. Same song writers, a lot of the same animators and the same method to address a larger issue in the structure of a fairy tale. Looking at them side by side, though, I think the Beauty of the Beast does it a little bit better. It does have what I consider Alan Menken’s and Howard Ashman’s best soundtrack, perhaps the best soundtrack of all Disney movies, not just in terms of the music, but also in the terms of how the songs are used. It also doesn’t undermine the message of the movie at any point, and it doesn’t take the detours The Little Mermaid takes. I think only one those two should be in the top three, and while The Little Mermaid introduced a great concept for a Disney Princess movie, Beauty and the Beast improved on it on every turn and therefore deserves to be in the top three.

And I guess it is time for The Secret of Nimh to go. All the other movies on the list are highly influential. The Secret of Nimh isn’t. It is mostly retreating the familiar Disney paths, not the ones Disney was walking on in the 1980s, but the ones Disney used to frequent when Walt Disney was still active in the Studio and kept pushing it to new highs. It is a really good movie, easily Don Bluth best, but it doesn’t have the overall impact the other movies (including The Little Mermaid) had. And while it is good, there are some points one has to overlook to enjoy the movie, like the presence of a magical stone in a story about science. So the top three is:

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

That is actually kind of disappointing because those are mostly the expected choices. But I guess, quality always finds its audience eventually.

So, let’s take a look at the readers choice. Lady and the Tramp, the Great Mouse Detective and The Iron Giant fall out of the competition. This is the list of movies left:

 

By the time I am posting this, the main Christmas Celebration in Germany is already over. I hope you all have a Christmas which is at least as much fun as mine was.


The Swanpride Award: The Top Five

The Top Ten:

The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926) by Lotte Reiniger, Silhouette

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

Sleeping Beauty (1959), Walt Disney, Traditional

Watership Down (1978), Martin Rosen, Traditional

The Secret of Nimh (1982), Don Bluth, Traditional

Grave of the Fireflies (1988), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

The Little Mermaid (1989), Disney, Tradtional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

The Nighmare before Christmas (1993), Skellington/Disney, Stop Motion

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

Kicking off five movies from this list will be really hard. So, what should the best movie of the century have? It should have great music. Well, all of those movies have great soundtrack, with the possible exception of Grave of the Fireflies, which only has a good one. It should have fluid, top notch animation. Which brings me back to Watership Down, which is easily the cheapest looking in this line-up (not in general, but compared to what the other movies have to offer). And it should have memorable characters in a meaningful story.

Mmm….I already wrote that Grave of the Fireflies is meaningful, but not really in the way it was intended to be. That is an aspect which can’t be overlooked during the judgement. The Adventures of Prince Achmed made it so far because it is a really impressive and in its own way influential movie, but its one big weakness are the characters and the story. This is a fairy tale full of very simple characters and the fact that it is a silent movie can no longer be an excuse for this.

The Nightmare before Christmas is another one which mainly made it that far due to its memorable soundtrack, weird designs and top-notch animation. The story is also quite good but where I kind of struggle is when I look at the characters. I still think that Jack is the only truly memorable one in the movie.

Okay, those are four movies….I still have to kick-off one.  And now I am REALLY in trouble. Because this will be the first time I will decide totally against my personal taste. I love Sleeping Beauty. I think it is a really underrated movie and deserves to be praised to the heavens because it is one of the most unusual pieces of animation out there. There simply is no other movie which has ever been animated like this. It is also a way more influential movie than most people realize (partly because it is always forgotten how old this movie is). More or less every fantasy movie which came after it copied some of the designs. The Swan Princess ripped off this movie left and right. Disney itself reused some of the best parts. The dance in the end turns up again at the end of Beauty and the Beast, Jafar in Aladdin is basically a less threatening copy of Maleficent, The Lion King reused the idea with the tree bridge (and made it more iconic in the process).

If this award session would be based only on personal taste, Sleeping Beauty would at the very least end up in the top three…it might even end up the overall winner. But I need to consider every angle and there is no denying that there are some pacing problems (mainly the scene with the kings being too long) and plot contrivances which I can’t overlook. It is a hard decision, but the top five animated movies of the 20th century are:

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

The Secret of Nimh (1982), Don Bluth, Traditional

The Little Mermaid (1989), Disney, Tradtional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

Well, in the readers choice selection, Sleeping Beauty also was just voted out, alongside with Charlotte’s Web, The Nightmare before Christmas, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh and The Prince of Egypt. Tomorrow I’ll add picks to the list one last time, since I don’t think that there will be much of a change in the voting of the past articles. So, last chance to put any movie from the late 1980s forward. And another chance to kick up to five movies off the list.

 

 


The Swanpride Award: Top Ten

Well, those are movies still in the competition:

The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926) by Lotte Reiniger, Silhouette

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

Sleeping Beauty (1959), Walt Disney, Traditional

Yellow Submarine (1968), Georg Dunning, Traditional

Watership Down (1978), Martin Rosen, Traditional

The Secret of Nimh (1982), Don Bluth, Traditional

The Great Mouse Detective (1986), Disney, Traditional

Grave of the Fireflies (1988), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

The Little Mermaid (1989), Disney, Tradtional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

The Nighmare before Christmas (1993), Skellington/Disney, Stop Motion

Ghost in the Shell (1995), Mamoro Oshii, Traditional

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

The Iron Giant (1999), Warner Bros, Traditional

Time to narrow the list down to ten. Let’s start with the easy choices: I said that Yellow Submarine wouldn’t have won in any other decade and I stand to my opinion. No matter which movie I would have picked for the 1960s, it would have been fallen out of the competition at this stage for sure.

And speaking of Yellow Submarine, one of the main reasons I consider it inferior is the quality of the animation. I therefore decided to use this as my first criteria and scratch movies off the list which don’t manage to shine through animation. Those which are struggling in this regard, usually because of budget issues, are Watership Down, The Great Mouse Detective, Ghost in the Shell and The Iron Giant. Only one of those four can make it to the next round.   Now, they all have something good about their animation. In the case of Watership Down and Ghost in the Shell, it’s artistic elements, in the case of The Great Mouse Detective and The Iron Giant it’s technical achievements. Technical achievements are impressive, but artistic elements are time-less. So I have to make a decision between Watership Down and Ghost in the Shell.

Mmmm…..I go for Watership Down. Mostly because I think that the gory moments in Watership Down are actually making a point, while the gory ones in Ghost in the Shell often feel a little bit too indulgent. This leaves the following Top Ten:

The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926) by Lotte Reiniger, Silhouette

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

Sleeping Beauty (1959), Walt Disney, Traditional

Watership Down (1978), Martin Rosen, Traditional

The Secret of Nimh (1982), Don Bluth, Traditional

Grave of the Fireflies (1988), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

The Little Mermaid (1989), Disney, Tradtional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

The Nighmare before Christmas (1993), Skellington/Disney, Stop Motion

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

 

So, let’s take a look at the reader choice…at the moment I am writing this, Snow White, Cinderella, Aladdin and The Jungle book have the most votes and fall out of the competition.

I added a few more to the list (strangle nobody voted for the year 1995, but there was a comment vote for Toy Story, so I added it). Same deal as before: Five possible choices and you have to pick the movies you don’t want to win.

 


The Swanpride Award: Final Selection

Time to see, which movies are still in the run:

The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926) by Lotte Reiniger, Silhouette

Fantasia (1940), Walt Disney, Traditional

Sleeping Beauty (1959), Walt Disney, Traditional

Yellow Submarine (1968), Georg Dunning, Traditional

Watership Down (1978), Martin Rosen, Traditional

The Secret of Nimh (1982), Don Bluth, Traditional

The Great Mouse Detective (1986), Disney, Traditional

Grave of the Fireflies (1988), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

The Little Mermaid (1989), Disney, Tradtional

Beauty and the Beast (1991), Disney, Traditional

The Nighmare before Christmas (1993), Skellington/Disney, Stop Motion

Ghost in the Shell (1995), Mamoro Oshii, Traditional

Princess Mononoke (1997), Studio Ghibli, Traditional

The Iron Giant (1999), Warner Bros, Traditional

14 Movies and to my big surprise, only six of them are Disney productions, one of them not even done by the animation studio. But that is mostly because Disney tends to release their best movies in a row, so often outstanding Disney movies knocked other really great ones out of the competition.

I am not surprised, though, that most of the movies are traditionally animated. The 20th century was the century of traditional animation. I guess the 21th century will be the century of CGI.

Naturally my readers didn’t always agree with me. In some years, there simply were a number of good movies and sometimes I picked a fairly unknown movie over a very well-known one. I admit, though, that I am very happy that nobody so far has used the “other” option at my polls – well, someone did, but since he or she didn’t bother to comment what should have won instead, I guess at the very least I got the nomination lists right.

Now, tomorrow I will narrow down the list to ten, then to five, then to three and then I will decide on the final winner. I’ll deal with the movies my readers voted for a little bit different. Mostly because it would be premature to close the polls for the last movies I discussed. So here is what I’ll do: I’ll put every movie anyone has ever voted for on a list, but from those articles which have been up at least one week. Everyday you can vote out five which you don’t think deserve the overall win. And everyday I will add new movies which got votes later to the list. I guess this way we should be able to find a readers choice winner by new year.